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'Communication Style: High Compliance Style' from Your Talent@Work with Shawn Kent Hayashi

Communication Style: High Compliance Style

Posted: May 31, 2011

Spotting the High Compliance Style in conversations. The High Compliance style has these behavioral characteristics:

  • Likes accuracy and cautiousness
  • Is good at creating policy and procedures and responding to rules set by others
  • Can be perceived as too cautious by other styles
  • May be overly critical of self and others
  • Enjoys solving complex problems and thinking through details
  • Analyzes and systematizes
  • Has high expectations
  • Expects others to follow the rules too
  • Is troubled by risky situations and unscheduled events
  • Does not like too much focus on emotions or feelings
  • Fears criticism of work
  • Will worry during times of change
  • Reduces stress by having alone time to think
  • Needs to learn to be more open verbally to share what is in his or her mind and heart
  • Is a cautious decision maker

Someone with a High Compliance style will be drawn to:

  • Conservative ideals
  • Proven records
  • High-quality standards
  • Formality
  • Privacy
  • Measurable value and results

When speaking with a High Compliance-style person, use these phrasings:

  • "The research shows . . ."
  • "Would you analyze the data?"
  • "There is no risk in us exploring these three options first . . ."
  • "The facts are . . ."
  • "There is a 90-day guarantee . . ."
  • "This has a proven track record . . ."

When talking with a High Compliance-style person, avoid:

  • Rushing the conversation, leaving little or no time for questions
  • Asking for a personal opinion, gut reaction, or personal information
  • Being emotional, random, or disorganized

Who do you know who prefers the High Compliance Communication Style?

How can you use these ideas to connect with them?

Each person has a preference that includes looking out of one, two, or three of these communication styles. One or two styles tend to be used less than the others. The style we use less is the one that we likely have the most trouble with when we interact with people who choose that style as their preference.

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